Kiln Glass... What's That? (Part 1, 12.15.18)

Most people know about glassblowing — which is amazing!! (I actually learned glassblowing at Penland School of Crafts in 2016. But, I am not a glassblower:) Many people know stained glass and mosaic glass.

However, fewer know (or understand) kiln glass. (Or they might know stuff that’s very flat and simple — almost like a glass quilt.)

How do I get luscious, water-inspired depth and movement of my glass??

(Like DETAIL seen below.)

Close up detail of new water glass.  (Fun side note: the darks are actually chemical reactions:)

Close up detail of new water glass. (Fun side note: the darks are actually chemical reactions:)

 
I start with the gorgeous  Bullseye Glass  — made in Portland, OR. Using their raw sheet, frit, and stringers, I put colors together. (A little  Interior Design Magazine  inspiration seen at top of pic.)

I start with the gorgeous Bullseye Glass — made in Portland, OR. Using their raw sheet, frit, and stringers, I put colors together. (A little Interior Design Magazine inspiration seen at top of pic.)

 
In bottom left corner, see an actual glass test color palette — so I know how different colors react to each other. (Many colors fire in kiln close to what they look like originally, but not all do.)

In bottom left corner, see an actual glass test color palette — so I know how different colors react to each other. (Many colors fire in kiln close to what they look like originally, but not all do.)

 
Lots of cut pieces of Bullseye Glass seen here. They are really like my paint… I mix the raw colors to get new water glass. (This “striker” color — seen at bottom — turns from “clear” to milky white when fired to certain temperature in my electric kilns.) I use different hand held glass cutters — depending on whether I want straight, circle, or organic cuts.

Lots of cut pieces of Bullseye Glass seen here. They are really like my paint… I mix the raw colors to get new water glass. (This “striker” color — seen at bottom — turns from “clear” to milky white when fired to certain temperature in my electric kilns.) I use different hand held glass cutters — depending on whether I want straight, circle, or organic cuts.

 
This is my biggest electric kiln. (Similar to kilns used in pottery, but shelves and heat/firing schedules are different.) I LITERALLY use the heat and gravity to mix my colors:)

This is my biggest electric kiln. (Similar to kilns used in pottery, but shelves and heat/firing schedules are different.) I LITERALLY use the heat and gravity to mix my colors:)

 
One of my many kiln firing techniques is to “pre-fire” or slump glass parts — where I  barely  heat them. See molds inside kiln here. Pink is actually the kiln shelf wash — keeps glass from sticking to ceramic molds. (The white has already been fired, but is still good enough to use again.)

One of my many kiln firing techniques is to “pre-fire” or slump glass parts — where I barely heat them. See molds inside kiln here. Pink is actually the kiln shelf wash — keeps glass from sticking to ceramic molds. (The white has already been fired, but is still good enough to use again.)

 
Finally, here the strips of sheet glass and stringers placed over the molds — to be slumped into shapes that will (later) be combined with more glass and fired much hotter. (BEFORE firing.)

Finally, here the strips of sheet glass and stringers placed over the molds — to be slumped into shapes that will (later) be combined with more glass and fired much hotter. (BEFORE firing.)

Carmella Jarvi